Issues

The Christina River Watershed is vital to regional water quality.

Climate Change

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Christina Water quality trends

Water Quality

 In the Christina River watershed, water quality has improved since 1995 but nutrients and bacteria continue to be a problem. Dissolved oxygen (DO) and total suspended solids (TSS) – two basic water quality parameters – have improved across the watershed and consistently meet water quality criteria.  Bacteria levels have improved across the watershed, but continue …

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Sea Level Rise

A Changing Watershed Like other watersheds around the world, the Christina River Watershed is subject to changing environmental conditions for a variety of reasons.   Land use changes, changes in weather patterns and trends over time, and even changes in the Delaware River and Bay and the ocean can all impact the water quality and natural …

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Chemical Contaminants

The DelawareWatersheds.org website has posted information on contaminants in the Christina River. Contaminants The Christina River Watershed has a total of two hundred and fifty-nine sites listed in the Site Investigation and Restoration Section database. There are eighty four Brownfield program sites, seventy-eight sites in the Voluntary Cleanup Program (VCP), seventy-four state-fund lead (HSCA) sites, …

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Invasive Species

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Wetlands

Protect and Preserve Christina River Watershed Wetlands The Christina River Watershed has fresh water wetlands, found in marshy and swampy areas along the river and streams, around ponds, in marshes, and in other locations.  Wetlands are extremely vital because they control flooding, act as a filter to remove pollutants from waterways and runoff, and provide …

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Trees and forests are one of the best ways to reduce pollutants, sedimentation, and stormwater runoff.

Forests and Water Quality

Water seems common, but you might be surprised to know just how uncommon it really is. As far as we know, Earth is the only planet in our solar system where water exists as a liquid. No living thing — plant or animal — can survive without it. In fact, water makes up a large …

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